6 Best Apps for Musicians

Today’s technology is constantly changing and growing and to keep up to date everyone, even musicians, must learn to use it to our advantage. There are thousands of different music apps and computer programs designed for and by musicians. These are just a few of my favorite apps that I use on my iPad for practice and teaching lessons.

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Tonal Energy(iOS/ Android $3.99)

I use this music app everyday as a tuner, a metronome, and a recording device. I love having everything in one place. Perfect for every instrument, the tuner can listen to you and tune you to both a concert pitch and your instrument pitch with the use of a green smiley face, or it can play a sustained pitch for you to match. The metronome gives you easy access to 60+ different meters!! You can even set up a sequenced met for pieces with multiple different meters and tempo changes. But my all time favorite feature of the Tonal Energy app is the audio/ video recording feature. You can record yourself playing and then play it back at any speed you want to listed to your self and really isolate you’re playing.

Fingering Charts Pro(iOS $2.99)

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Fingerings are crucial to playing any instrument. You may assume you and your students should know all your fingerings, but not all instruments respond the same to each fingering. Fingering Charts Pro is perfect for finding alternate fingering to make harder passages easier and help you find the perfect fingering for your instruments intonation. This music app has fingering charts for 21 different instruments that are easy to navigate and understand.

 

Smart Music(iPad FREE)

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Smart Music is the perfect application for private lessons and classes. With both an iPad app and a computer program, Smart Music is easy to access for all students with access to the internet. Smart Music allows teachers to create classes, enroll students, and assign students playing assessments and enforce practice sessions. There are thousands of different method books and solos with accompaniments . With its own metronome, fingering charts, tuner, and immediate assessments, this is the perfect practice tool for young musicians.

Chromatik(iOS/ Android FREE)

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Chromatik is a fun app to play around with. It has various music from different genres including classical, jazz, rock, pop, musicals, and popular movies for every instrument. You can highlight, take notes, record, and even play along with the music video on Vevo! This app is perfect for finding quick fun music that everyone knows and loves.

Garage Band(iOS $4.99)

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As electric backing tracks are becoming more popular, Garage Band is becoming more popular. If you are a musician interested in composing or playing with an original backing track, garage band is the perfect app for you. With the ability to record vocals, play the key board and other stimulated instruments, you can create your own music to play along with. Some popular bands first albums were made with garage band tools.

Scanner Pro (iOS/ Android $3.99)

This might be the most helpful app. Making hundreds of copies of music all day everyday, can be very tiring, but its even worse when some one needs music they don’t have.  Scanner Pro makes it easy to take a PDF scan of music right from your phone so you can email it to anyone in just seconds. I have done this many times for my private lessons.

Now I know some of these music apps cost money, but it is so worth it. I have tried lots of different apps but these are my all time favorites that I have found to be the most effective.

Clarineat Podcast Review and Interview with Sean Perrin

I discovered the Clarineat Podcast at Clarinetfest this fall and have been listening to Sean Perrin’s interviews and product reviews ever sense.  I am so excited to get the opportunity to talk with Sean Perrin and share my thoughts on the podcast.  Sean has  interviewed many artists including some of my favorites: Martin Fröst, Michael Lowenstern, Harry Sparnaay, and Michael Norsworthy.

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I chose to do a post on the Clarineat Podcast because I am very impressed with all of the work Sean is doing to bring “all that’s new and neat for clarinet” to his listeners all over the world.

How the Clarineat Podcast Came to Be

When asked why he decided to start his podcasts, Sean responded saying:

“In late 2015 I was listening to a lot of podcasts, as I always do, but I was becoming bored of the shows that I typically listened to. So I decided to search for something clarinet related iTunes, but there was nothing. Every month I kept checking back with no success, and I started to get a little impatient.

Then one day I got carried away chatting with Peter Spriggs on the phone for over an hour. He was sharing some great stories, and we were having such a great conversation. Suddenly it hit me: this was exactly the kind of conversation I wanted to hear on a clarinet podcast! Why couldn’t I try and make the very show I had been searching for?

After this “Eureka moment” I got to work right away, and I’m sure glad I did!”

Sean Perrin

How He Decides Who to interview

Sean interviews a wide range of performers(not all clarinetists), teachers, manufacturers along with giving his own opinion on products. He has a new topic of discussion for each of his interviews that makes each of them unique. When asked how he picked his guests for his podcasts, Sean explained that:

“I tried to select guests that are not only great clarinetists (ex. Martin Fröst and Michael Lowenstern), but also people who are interesting and meaningful to the community in an indirect way (ex. Etymotic Research, Daryl Caswell). In fact, I have found some of the most valuable conversations have actually been with non-clarinetists because their perspective is so different.

Looking back at the first season, it seems that I subconsciously focused on guests and topics who I really wanted to talk to (contemporary music, freelancing, technology, etc.). This is fine, of course, because it is important that I’m engaged with the guests and knowledgeable about the topic.”

He even gives some insight into what we can look forward to this year and how you can get involved if you have any suggestions for episode topics:

“However, I think for the second season I’m going to intentionally step outside of my comfort zone. I’m looking to include a wide variety of orchestral players, klezmer musicians, educators, manufacturers, and more.

In fact, I’m open to suggestions! If anyone would like to apply to be a guest, or send requests my way, I would encourage them to please get in touch at feedback@clarineat.com.”

Advice from Sean

Concerning careers in music, Sean is a very knowledgeable and experienced. I’m sure he could talk about the do’s and don’ts of how to succeed but here is a quick summary he offered for us:

1) It’s important that you take responsibility for your career. It may be hard to hear this, but the fact of the matter is that nobody really, truly cares if you succeed or fail except for YOU. You will have to decide what it is the really want to do, and then find a way to get there. If you don’t, you won’t. And not deciding, is deciding not to.

2) Spend some time outside the practice room learning some basic business, marketing, and networking skills. Then use them! Being good at your instrument is simply not enough these days (if it ever even was). Gigs might be perfected in the practice room, but they are never found there. Ever.

3) Nothing is more compelling than someone who is truly different. But nothing is more boring than someone who is different simply for the sake. Different doesn’t mean better. This brings to mind another quote:

My Personal Thoughts and Favorites

As I said before, I have been very excited to write this post not only because it is my first review, but because I have enjoyed listening to the podcast and my conversations with Sean. One of my favorite parts of the Clarineat podcasts are his interviews with Micheal Norsworthy of the Boston Conservatory. I personally have been looking into both the Berklee College of Music and the Boston Conservatory for possible options for graduate school. Listening to Mr. Norsworthy talk about his own experiences with his lessons teachers  was very entertaining. I also enjoyed listening to Ryan Pereira of 3D Clarinet Innovations .  I first came across Pereira 3D at the 2016 Clarinet Festival hosted by the International Clarinet Association. I was very interested in how the 3D printing worked and how it effected the sound of the clarinet. I was very excited to see that Sean had already done all the work for me and all I had to do was sit and listen. These were the first two podcasts I listened to, but they were by far my two favorites. I personally prefer the interviews of musicians to the product reviews, but it has all been very interesting.

I am so glad that Sean Perrin has taken on the task of bringing the Clarineat podcast to life. Its a lot of work for one person, but he is doing a magnificent job and has many supporters. I encourage you to listen to his podcast on itunes or on his website here.