Belmont Summer Winds

Last Summer I was not satisfied with the quality of band camp I attended thus I began the search for a new camp.  I decided the best idea to narrow my search was to look for summer programs at the different colleges I was interested in. That’s when I found Belmont Summer Winds.

I had been looking into Belmont University for a while because of its reputation as a good Christian Private Liberal arts school with a music therapy program, a great clarinet professor, and its gorgeous campus. Everything was exactly as I had hoped it would be.

Belmont Summer Winds

Belmont Summer Winds is a band camp hosted at the Belmont University campus in Nashville, TN run by Belmont’s Director of Bands, Barry Kraus. During this one week session, students participate in master classes, jazz ensembles. woodwind ensembles, brass ensembles, private lessons, and Wind Ensemble rehearsals led by Belmont staff and alumni. After each full day of music, students enjoy fun activities on campus to get to know each other and have a little fun (Not that rehearsals aren’t fun but…..)

Auditions

Auditioning for Belmont’s Summer Winds Camp was actually my favorite audition I’ve ever done. Not because I played my best, but because I got to pick from my own repetition what I was going to play. The last band camp I went to required me to spend all summer learning and preparing my All Region and All State material in hopes that I would make first band. But this summer I got to play one of the solos I had been preparing in my lessons at home and with only one band total I was only competing for a chair. This was a lot less stressful and a lot more convenient as students who attended the camp came from all different states. Learning both Arkansas and Tennessee All Region Material in one summer would have been a challenge.

Master Class

The clarinet Master Class was led by Belmont’s Clarinet Professor, Dr. Daniel Lochrie (pronounced like Loch in Lochness Monster). Throughout the week, master classes were the time we got to get feed back on our playing from a professional clarinetist. Dr. Lochrie plays with  the Grammy-winning Nashville Symphony and is co-founder of The Eastwood Ensemble. Through out the week he gave us classes on the basics: tone, scales, fingering, embouchure, tonguing, articulation, voicing, hand position, sight-reading, piece preparation, and nerves. (man we got a lot done). I don’t think I’ve ever been in a more productive master class. In one week we covered everything clarinet that I can think of. Hopefully soon I can write a blog post about each of the aspects of clarinet and share some of Dr. Lochrie’s insight and teaching methods.

Private Lessons

I treated my week at camp as a Belmont crash course. Belmont was one of my top two colleges that I was considering to join next fall (more on that later) so one of my main priorities while I was there was to get some private lessons from Dr. Lochrie to get to know him better, introduce myself as an interested future student, and play for him. I think this was the best thing I did while I was at Belmont. During my lesson Dr. Lorchie and I talked about Belmont’s audition process, its scholarship opportunities, and even the idea of getting to play with Vanderbilt’s Marching Band because Belmont does not have one of its own. Most of what I learned about the school of music at Belmont including their performance, education, and therapy programs I learned during my two hours of lessons with Dr. Lochrie.

Sectionals

Sectionals are always so fun. How often do you get to play a piece with only woodwind parts during high school band? Unless you go to a school who focuses on small ensembles, this never happens. The band camp I attended last summer was very brass focused which was great…. for the brass players. But this camp had equal focus on brass, woodwinds, and percussion due to the quality of time and attention we received in our respective sectional classes everyday.

Chamber Music

I believe that the two best thing you can do for your music career is 1: take private lessons and 2: play in chamber groups. By playing one on a part in a small ensemble, you have to be responsible not only for your part, but for fitting yourself in the groups sound. At Belmont’s camp I had the opportunity to play in a woodwind quintet. I have playing in duets and trios, but I have never played in a woodwind quintet before. It was so fun to be playing music focusing on woodwinds.

Wind Ensemble

Led by Dr. Kraus, the Wind Ensemble spent two classes a day in group band rehearsals preparing music to perform in one week. My band only plays one concert a year and we get months to prepare, but one full concert with a large wind ensemble, a jazz, ensemble, woodwind quintets, brass quintets, and other instrumented ensembles is a lot to learn and prepare in one week. But we did it!!! Performing such a long, challenging program and doing it well was a huge accomplishment for everyone who participated.

Out of the two band camps I have attended, Belmont was by far my favorite. I highly recommend looking into it even if Belmont is not a school you are looking into for college. I traveled 8 hours from Arkansas to Tennessee, but one guy at camp traveled all the way from California to attend camp at Belmont . No matter where you are or who you are, look into Belmont Summer Winds Camp for next summer.

Third Coast Percussion

The Grammy Award winning percussion quartet, Third Coast Percussion, recently visited the Northwest Arkansas area to perform in the Walton Arts Centers 10×10 series. The 10×10 Arts Series is a season of 10 performances hosted by the Walton Arts Center with the intent to bring new and unique art forms to the Northwest Arkansas Community at the low cost of $10 a ticket.  Third Coast Percussion has been performing and expanding the depth of the world of percussion.

third coast percussion, walton arts center, 10x10, 10x10 series, 10x10 art series, reedit, reeditclari.net

Who is Third Coast Percussion?

Each of the four quartet members are classically trained percussionists and composers. Based in Chicago, the Third Coast Percussion is the ensemble-in-residence at the University of Notre Dame’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Third Coast Percussion put on an outstanding performance that was full of new experiences that blew their audience away.

Outreach

Throughout the week, the ensemble put on multiple master classes, and performances involving students of all ages and local musicians. Each of the members of Third Coast Percussion have been music educators at some point in their careers. This leads them be very passionate about their community outreach. They believe that “art is an invaluable experience for people of all ages.”

The Program

The program they performed Friday night,  Lyrical Geometry , is a unique and energetic collaboration of both traditional percussion and unconditional instruments. During the performance, Quartet member, Robert Dillon commented on the diverse selection of instrumentation; asking “What is a percussion instrument?” The definition of a percussion instrument is “a musical instrument that is sounded by being struck or scrapped”, but Third Coast Percussion believe that a percussion instrument is “anything you ask a percussionist to play and they say yes” or anything “that the other musicians wont play.” This seemed to be the general theme for this concert. The program included obscure instruments such as Japanese Temple Bowls and amplified table tops.

The Lyrical Geometry Program :

Wild Sound

Composed by Glenn Kotche, Wild Sound, uses a combination of marimbas and vibraphones that create an almost “wild” sound with its very fast and systematic layering of rhythms. At some points the rhythms were complementary, and at others, it was almost overwhelming. However, none of this distracted from the enjoyment of the piece. I was impressed by the way that the musicians maintained their inner pulse and were able to pull off such a feat so that their listeners did not get lost or distracted. This piece was an introduction to the rest of the performance by establishing the traditional percussion techniques with new flourishes and flares to establish a new art form all together.

Table Music

Composed by Theirry De Mey, Table Music, was by far the audiences favorite piece in the program. After the show, everyone was wondering which of the Third Coast Percussion Albums had a recording of Table Music on it. Sadly, Third Coast Percussion has not yet released a recording of them playing this piece. I was blown away by the use of amplified tables in the Table Music piece performed by Peter Martin, Sean Connors, and David Skidmore. As a tap dancer, the idea of making rhythms with your hands was amazing. The music for this piece includes descriptions of the exact way to hit or touch the table to make a particular sound. This makes the piece resemble both music and choreographed dance at the same time.

Resounding Earth mvt. II Prayer

Composed by Augusta Read Thomas, Resounding Earth, was composed for and dedicated to Third Coast Percussion. This is a very unique piece that requires the use of hundreds of metal instruments including singing bowls and bells from numerous different cultures. This piece celebrates the idea that music brings cultures together and the vast variety of musical instruments.The piece is made up of four movements: Invocation, Prayer, Mantra, and Reverie. As Robert Dillon explained the entire work is about 30 minutes long. So for time’s sake, Third Coast Percussion only performed the third movement, Prayer. Prayer, is an even distribution of eeriness and beauty that seems to grow out of nothingness. Third Coast Percussion had me sitting on the edge of my seat afraid to move or disturb the perfect balance of silence and music.

third coast percussion, japanese bowls, reedit, walton arts center, 10x10 series
Third Coast Percussion

Mallet Quartet

Composed by Steve Reich, Mallet Percussion, is another composition written for two marimbas and two vibraphones with multiple movements. Third Coast Percussion played all three of these movements: Fast, Slow, and Fast.  In the two Fast movements, the two marimbas provide the foundation cannon like background that continues through out the piece while the two vibraphones take turns playing the solo-like melody. I admire Sean and Robert for their fluidity as they seamlessly passed around the melody without delay. During the Slow movement, the instrumentation thins out. I enjoyed how the ensemble did not pause between the three movements and they seemed to just flow into one fluid song despite the contrast between slow and fast movements.

BEND

Composed by ensemble member, Peter Martin, BEND, is composed for a percussion quartet using two marimbas. This piece uses various different mallets, bows, and sticking techniques to create a unique sound. The bows create a very different sound when they are run across the edge of the keys that sounds like the bending of music. The piece ebbs and flows in an unpredictable and pattern-less way. As soon as a common theme is established, it is abruptly changed with the introduction of a new sound, or a drastic change of dynamics.  This was a very entertaining piece that I was not expecting to hear. I especially enjoyed the use of the other end of the mallets.

Ordering-instincts

Composed by ensemble member, Robert Dillon, Ordering-instincts, is a 10 minute piece including the only two drums in the program, wooden blocks, and a few metal “disks”.  It was easy to get lost in all the new sounds you were hearing. But with the aid of a live video streaming to a screen above the stage, you could see the choreographed dance of the musicians. Their music provided a road map to guide them through the traffic of the piece. Creating perfectly organized sound, music.

Blindness

Composed by Isaac Schankler, Blindness, is composed for 4 percussionists playing on one vibraphone accompanied by an electronic recording. At first I was a little skeptical about how 4 grown men could play the same instruments at the same time, but all of my doubts were put to rest the moment they began playing. In the past, my personal experiences playing with an electronic backing track have not been successful. But in this composition the electronic track did not take away from the ensembles performance, but added additional sound effects resembling sounds one would expect to hear if they were blind.

Aliens with Extraordinary Abilities

Composed by ensemble member, David Skidmore, Aliens with Extraordinary Abilities, was the perfect end to a phenomenal program. This piece incorporated visual art by projecting an animated design that was mesmerizing and moved with the music. This addition to the program emphasized how all art forms are connected in their abilities to express feelings and movement without out the use of traditional language. Art: music, design, dance, and literature are all abstract forms of communication used to express what one does not have the courage to express on their own. I feel that this composition described the diversity of life and talents among people.

I am not a percussionist but as a musician, I am enamored by new art forms and Third Coast Percussion did not disappoint. Each piece introduced a new theme accompanied by a perfect blend of traditional instruments and new sounds. The program was a perfect arrangements of pieces that made a statement: the art world is changing. I had never seen or heard anything remotely familiar to what Third Coast Percussion played. Third Coast Percussion never ceased to impress me.

The Grammy

third coast percussion, walton arts center, 10x10 series, 10x10, 10x10 art series, reedit, reeditclari.net
Third Coast Percussion at The 59th Annual Grammy Awards

A Percussion Quartet is not the norm, but Third Coast Percussion despite skepticism from friends, they did it anyway and won a Grammy for it! In the 59th Annual Grammy Awards, the quartet won their first Grammy for Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance on their album featuring works by Steve Reich, an iconic percussionist and composer. In their Performance at the Grammy Awards, they performed the third movement Steve Reich’s Mallet Quartet with jazz saxophonist, Ravi Coltrane. This is a huge game changer for the world of percussion as it is  the first time a percussion ensemble has won a Grammy in a Chamber Music category.

Third Coast Percussion is opening doors for future generations of percussionists. Percussion has come a long way since the 18th century and the invention of the drum. Percussionists are constantly looking for new things to play around with to create new sounds.  Third Coast Percussion is always pushing the boundaries of what percussion is. Modernist composer, Edgard Varèse, once said that music is “organized sound” when referring to his own musical style. I feel that this definition of music describes Third Coasts Percussion perfectly.

To listen to Third Coast Percussion check them out on sound cloud or my video page:

Walton Arts Center, 10x10, 10x10 art series, third coast percussion, reedit, reeditclari.net

Arkansas Winds Concert: Myths and Legends

Witches, trolls, the Loch Ness monster, Sasquatch, Quasimodo, and the constant battle of good and evil, light and dark, angels and demons. What better themes are there for a concert. Such heroism and darkness combined to make an action packed performance that will keep you on the edge of your seat. This is exactly the reaction that the Arkansas Winds Community Concert Band was trying to create in their concert Myths and Legends this last Saturday. We had a surprisingly good turn out, over 100 people attended the concert and I hope each and everyone of them enjoyed it.

arkansas winds, arkansas winds community concert band, concert, band, community, myths, myths and, myths and legends, concert 2017

On Saturday, February 25th , I performed with the Arkansas Winds Community Concert Band in the Myths and Legends  concert. The concert was held at the Farmington Performing Arts Center at 7:00pm.  Admission for the concert was free and open to the community as are most of the Arkansas Winds’ concerts.

The Program

The program for the concert reflected mythical stories and legendary feats from around the world including :

March of the Trolls – Edvard Grieg – arr. Brian Beck

Scheherazade – Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov – arr. Jay Bocook

Fantasy for Trumpet – Claude T. Smith

~~ Keith Wood, soloist ~~

Irish Tune from County Derry – Percy Grainger

~~ Kameron Parmain, conductor ~~

March and Cortege of Bacchus – Leo Delibes – arr. Joseph Kreines

The Witch and the Saint – Steven Reineke

Field Ayres – arr. Douglas Richard

~~ Davis Campbell, Walter Ferguson, Alex Clemons, soloists ~~

Monsters of Myth – Travis J. Weller

~ I. Quasimodo

~ II. Sasquatch

~ III. Nessie

La Tregenda – Giocomo Puccini – arr. Brian Beck


My favorite piece in the program featured Winds member Keith Wood as the trumpet soloist on the Claude T. Smith composition, “Fantasy for Trumpet“, commissioned for legendary artist “Doc” Severinsen. Keith received a degree in Trumpet Performance from North Texas. He performs with Naturally Brass, the Jack Terry Big Band, Full House, the Jack Mitchell Big Band, Combo and Praise Band, the Celebration Orchestra from the First Baptist Church of Springdale, and with Ken Lake and Ernest Whitmore in the LakeWood Trio. Keith Wood is a family friend of my parents, but through Winds, he has become a great inspiration of mine. He is an amazing trumpet player and hard worker. Not only is this piece an amazing arrangement of music that is right up my alley, but it is being played by one of the most talented people I know.

In Conclusion

 I am so thankful for everyone who came out and supported me. If you’d like to keep up to date with the Arkansas Community Concert Band, please check out our schedule here.

I am sorry that I was unable to post this before the concert, But I got a little busy with the Concert Etiquette posts.  I will try to post each of the concert updates a week before the event so anyone who would like to attend the concert can know a little bit about it before planning to attend.